Install MongoDB on Ubuntu 16.04

Run the following commands on the terminal to install MongoDB on Ubuntu 16.04

Create a list file for MongoDB.

Create the /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.4.list list file using the command appropriate for your version of Ubuntu:

Ubuntu 12.04
echo "deb [ arch=amd64 ] http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu precise/mongodb-org/3.4 multiverse" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.4.list
Ubuntu 14.04
echo "deb [ arch=amd64 ] http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu trusty/mongodb-org/3.4 multiverse" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.4.list
Ubuntu 16.04
echo "deb [ arch=amd64,arm64 ] http://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu xenial/mongodb-org/3.4 multiverse" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-3.4.list

Reload local package database.

Issue the following command to reload the local package database:

sudo apt-get update

Install the MongoDB packages.

Install the latest stable version of MongoDB.

Issue the following command:

sudo apt-get install -y mongodb

Run MongoDB Community Edition

Most Unix-like operating systems limit the system resources that a session may use. These limits may negatively impact MongoDB operation. See UNIX ulimit Settings for more information.

The MongoDB instance stores its data files in /var/lib/mongodb and its log files in /var/log/mongodbby default, and runs using the mongodb user account. You can specify alternate log and data file directories in /etc/mongod.conf. See systemLog.path and storage.dbPath for additional information.

If you change the user that runs the MongoDB process, you must modify the access control rights to the /var/lib/mongodb and /var/log/mongodb directories to give this user access to these directories.

Start MongoDB.

Issue the following command to start mongod:

sudo service mongod start

Verify that MongoDB has started successfully

Verify that the mongod process has started successfully by checking the contents of the log file at/var/log/mongodb/mongod.log for a line reading

[initandlisten] waiting for connections on port <port>

where <port> is the port configured in /etc/mongod.conf, 27017 by default.

Stop MongoDB.

As needed, you can stop the mongod process by issuing the following command:

sudo service mongod stop
Restart MongoDB.

Issue the following command to restart mongod:

sudo service mongod restart

Begin using MongoDB.

To help you start using MongoDB, MongoDB provides Getting Started Guides in various driver editions. See Getting Started for the available editions.

Before deploying MongoDB in a production environment, consider the Production Notes document.

Later, to stop MongoDB, press Control+C in the terminal where the mongod instance is running.

Uninstall MongoDB Community Edition

To completely remove MongoDB from a system, you must remove the MongoDB applications themselves, the configuration files, and any directories containing data and logs. The following section guides you through the necessary steps.

WARNING

This process will completely remove MongoDB, its configuration, and all databases. This process is not reversible, so ensure that all of your configuration and data is backed up before proceeding.

Stop MongoDB.

Stop the mongod process by issuing the following command:

sudo service mongod stop
Remove Packages.

Remove any MongoDB packages that you had previously installed.

sudo apt-get purge mongodb*
Remove Data Directories.

Remove MongoDB databases and log files.

sudo rm -r /var/log/mongodb
sudo rm -r /var/lib/mongodb

Update the permissions of your chosen path to allow the mongodb user to write to it, e.g.

chown $USER -R /home/user/data/mongodb

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